The Fastest Boat On the B. C. Coast [1908]

There is no doubt but what the Easthopes of Vancouver have good foundation for their claim to having the fastest motor boat on the Canadian Pacific Coast. The "Pathfinder" makes a good running average of 20 miles and is capable of more under favorable conditions. She is used by the Easthope Brothers as a striking example of what can be done with one of their regular stock engines.

Pathfinder is a substantially constructed speed model, 40 by 5 feet 6 inches, and is equipped with an Easthope 27 h.p. heavy-duty two-cycle engine of three cylinders, each weighing 500 pounds. This power plant turns a 26-inch three-bladed wheel measuring 5 1/2 inches across the blade at any speed up to 700 revolutions. The planking is of 3/8-inch cedar, copper-riveted throughout, an absence of vibration at high speed is a marked feature. Pathfinder has excellent lines forward which enable her to split a sea prettily. Her owners think nothing of running outside in English Bay in a breeze that would cause even a pretty good catboat sailor to hesitate before venturing out. Even at 21 miles an hour, she throws a comparatively small bow wave. When in action her stern rides on flaring bilges.

The Ebros, also an Easthope production, has been sold. This little combination boat that made so excellent a showing in the long-distance race from Seattle to Vancouver, her actual time being second only to that of the winner. Ebros was severely penalized by her rating, as she was not a strict cruising type, but her engine performance was all that could be desired. her deck and house plans have been altered so as to make her a very fast and comfortable boat for an afternoon's run or a short cruise. The Easthopes are large manufacturers of popular pleasure and commercial launches.

(Transcribed from Pacific Motor Boat, October 1908, p. 15. )

[Thanks to Greg Calkins for help in preparing this page]


Hydroplane History Home Page
This page was last revised Thursday, April 01, 2010 .
Your comments and suggestions are appreciated. Email us at wildturnip@gmail.com
Leslie Field, 2001